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Lens review

Samsung NX 45 mm f/1.8 2D/3D

13 June 2013
Szymon Starczewski

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration


Chromatic aberration

When it comes to the longitudinal chromatic aberration the lens cannot be praised. At the maximum relative aperture it is pretty distinct and, unfortunately, even after stopping down by 1 EV its influence remains still perceptible.

Samsung NX 45 mm f/1.8 2D/3D - Chromatic and spherical aberration


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Luckily the lateral chromatic aberration results are much better – that aberration remains imperceptible at most apertures, never reaching medium levels. The graph below shows that it behaves in an interesting way. Near the maximum relative aperture you get values of 0.04% which can be considered low. By f/2.8-f/5.6 the aberration remains negligible, reaching just 0.03%. Then it increases and gets near 0.05% but still it can be called low.

Samsung NX 45 mm f/1.8 2D/3D - Chromatic and spherical aberration


Spherical aberration

The Samsung 1.8/45 doesn’t correct the spherical aberration in a perfect way. You can notice it looking at the first photo in this chapter, where a slight shift of the depth of field is visible, and also consulting defocused images of light points. The image in front of the focus shows a dark centre surrounded by a lighter rim and behind the focus the situation is reverse.

Samsung NX 45 mm f/1.8 2D/3D - Chromatic and spherical aberration