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Lens review

Venus Optics LAOWA 12 mm f/2.8 ZERO-D

9 January 2019
Maciej Latałło

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration

Chromatic aberration

Wide angle and significant depth of field make it difficult to obtain clear out-of-focus areas with this lens. Still even if you try to do so, for example taking photos from the minimum focusing distance, it is difficult to find any tinted fragments. It seems the tested lens doesn’t have problems with correcting longitudinal chromatic aberration.

Venus Optics LAOWA 12 mm f/2.8 ZERO-D  - Chromatic and spherical aberration


When it comes to the lateral version of that aberration you can assess its performance by glancing at a graph below.

Venus Optics LAOWA 12 mm f/2.8 ZERO-D  - Chromatic and spherical aberration


On the edge of full frame you have no reasons to complain, especially if you take into account the angle of view you deal with. The aberration keeps a level of about 0.08% so on the borderline between low and medium. The situation is a bit worse on the edge of the APS-C/DX sensor - near the maximum relative aperture it is between medium and high but on stopping down it decreases to medium values.

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Canon 5D III, RAW, APS-C, f/2.8 Canon 5D III, RAW, APS-C, f/11.0
Venus Optics LAOWA 12 mm f/2.8 ZERO-D  - Chromatic and spherical aberration Venus Optics LAOWA 12 mm f/2.8 ZERO-D  - Chromatic and spherical aberration


Spherical aberration

In first photos of this chapter it would be difficult to notice any ‘focus shift’ effect. Unfortunately we didn’t manage to perform additional tests in this category because, with such a significant depth of field, the lens didn’t provide circles of light of a sensible size on both sides of the focal point. Still it seems the tested Laowa doesn’t have any serious problems with spherical aberration.