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Lens review

Sony FE 90 mm f/2.8 Macro G OSS

31 May 2019
Maciej Latałło

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration

Chromatic aberration When it comes to longitudinal chromatic aberration, you can find its traces in photos, presented below, but they are very slight; it means that aberration shouldn't bother you in real life.

Sony FE 90 mm f/2.8 Macro G OSS - Chromatic and spherical aberration

The graph below informs you about the level of lateral chromatic aberration.

Sony FE 90 mm f/2.8 Macro G OSS - Chromatic and spherical aberration

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You can have some reservations concerning the nearest area of the maximum relative aperture, where the level of that aberration is medium, but that's all. Already by f/4.0 the lateral chromatic aberration decreases to near 0.05% and it becomes low. In the most popular range for a macro lens, so from f/5.6 to f/16 apertures, the aberration remains negligible as its value amounts to about 0.02%.

A7R II, RAW, f/2.8 A7R II, RAW, f/8.0
Sony FE 90 mm f/2.8 Macro G OSS - Chromatic and spherical aberration Sony FE 90 mm f/2.8 Macro G OSS - Chromatic and spherical aberration


Spherical aberration

First photos of this chapter don't show any 'focus shift' symptoms. Additionally, defocused circles of light don't feature anything worrying either. The main difference between them consists of the presence of the aperture even at the maximum relative aperture. Still it has nothing to do with spherical aberration; as a result we can say the lens doesn't have any serious problems in this category.

A7R II, f/2.8, in front of A7R II, f/2.8, behind
Sony FE 90 mm f/2.8 Macro G OSS - Chromatic and spherical aberration Sony FE 90 mm f/2.8 Macro G OSS - Chromatic and spherical aberration